What You Need To Know About Marketing Translation Traps

A little slip or judgment in error on your part can make all the difference between failure and success. When you are launching global marketing campaigns, here are a few tricky elements which you should be aware of at all times, according to credible marketing translation services:

Humor

One man’s laughter is another man’s horror. You can see web warriors having rampant discussions online about whether something is funny or not. Especially, when you are trying to adapt ‘funny’ into a different culture or a foreign language, remember that just because something sounds hilarious in your culture or language, it might even cause offence in a different culture.

Idioms, Puns, and Metaphors

Copywriters make a lot of use of alliteration, repetition, and puns when writing advertising copy, taglines, or even headlines. These linguistic devices are the key to memorable and appealing adverts. However, this sophisticated approach entails a thorough comprehension of local culture and the language in which you are translating it to. While languages can be translated, it is harder for ideas to travel, especially when taking these concepts overseas. However, that does not mean that you sacrifice creativity. When marketing copy is replete with elements such as wordplay, your best approach is transcreation, especially if you want to preserve the special stylistic features of the original copy and the subtle nuances of the language.

The transcreation process factors in all idiomatic language and cultural considerations.  While if you mull over the literal consideration, the resulting copy may look a bit different, but it will convey the same thing to your audience, in a way which aligns with local sensibilities and brand character. Find out more about transcreation.

Colors and Imagery

The right Image will deliver brand messages and spark emotions in a subtle, compelling, and persuasive way. Therefore, the choice of colors, photographic style, and images has a major role to play when it comes to defining the brand identity. However, the problem is that these elements can be construed as a double-edged sword.

Words and imagery can mean different things in different contexts and the same thing can have positive associations in one culture and negative implications in another. In some markets, it can even not make sense at all, as often happens when the beauty of something is lost in translation. Colors can also have opposite connotations across cultures. For instance, red may be considered as the color of love and lust in one culture, and a symbol of violence and aggressiveness in another. Similarly, in the western culture, white is the color of peace, while it is associated with misfortune and bereavement in the East.